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God is Brazilian Josh Lacey

God is Brazilian

Josh Lacey

Published
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
238 pages
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 About the Book 

God is Brazilian. Deus é brasileiro. It’s a well-known phrase in Brazil, summing up something about the country, although no-one is quite sure exactly what.Just like God, football is Brazilian. On every street, on every beach, wherever you go in theMoreGod is Brazilian. Deus é brasileiro. It’s a well-known phrase in Brazil, summing up something about the country, although no-one is quite sure exactly what.Just like God, football is Brazilian. On every street, on every beach, wherever you go in the country, you will find people playing football, watching football, talking about football.In 1894, Charles Miller arrived in Brazil with a pair of boots, a book of rules and a football. He was shocked to discover that no-one knew how to play the beautiful game. So he marked out a pitch, gathered twenty young men, and divided them into two teams.Josh Lacey uncovers the history of the British community in Brazil. He shows the vital contribution that British engineers and entrepreneurs made to Brazil’s economy, history and identity. And he describes the profoundly moving biography of a man who gave Brazil its greatest gift, but lost everything - his heart, his soul and even his wife - to that seductive country.Today, Charles Miller has been forgotten. This is his story - a gripping narrative of one mans love of football and the clash between two very different cultures. A clash of discipline versus passion. The foxtrot versus the samba. The stiff upper lip versus swinging hips. Britain versus Brazil.Josh Lacey uses Millers extraordinary life as a springboard for sketching the wider landscape of the little documented British-Brazilian colonial adventure. And he does it as a novelist might, with plenty of imaginative mise en scene and an eye for the entertaining diversion that ends up taking us to the heart of things.The Daily TelegraphA good story well told and keenly researched.The ObserverAs Charlie Miller might have put it, a dashed fine read.The Sunday Telegraph